immolation

updated with the audio version

This is one of my favorite pieces that I’ve written on a number of levels. In terms of structure it is written in the Japanese choka form. Choka, a form of waka (Japanese court poetry of the 6th to 14th century) consists of alternating lines of five and seven syllables and ending with an extra line of seven syllables. The total length of the poem is indefinite.
As with most poems I try to write there is a duality being expressed. On one hand it alludes to the dark spectacle of self-destruction that can take place in poetry where the poet’s anguish becomes our entertainment. It is also a tribute to Thich Quang Duc, a Buddhist monk who earned his place in history with when he burned himself to death in protest of the persecution of Buddhists by the South Vietnamese government. (1963)
According to legend Thich Quang Duc’s body was later re-cremated, however despite the initial immolation, and the cremation that followed, his charred heart remained intact and was not destroyed.

D. W. Metz

the hits keep coming
words not fists maliciously
to gut and to jaw
scars of old are raw again

shouting in silence
bear witness the burning hope
poems of old he rides
across wires synapse misfires

from keyboard somber
roman candle poems explode
crowd gathers watching
some cheer the rising tempest

others silent mourn
of charred corpse but one thing left
heart impervious
reincarnation he wills

now bereft of happiness

—————–

This is one of my favorite pieces that I’ve written on a number of levels. In terms of structure it is written in the Japanese choka form. Choka, a form of waka (Japanese court poetry of the 6th to 14th century) consists of alternating lines of five and seven syllables and ending with an extra line of seven syllables. The total length of the poem is indefinite.
As with most poems I try to write there is a duality…

View original post 93 more words

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s